employee engagement

Many businesses have a mission statement posted on their website; some even write down specific values important to their business. But is it really meaningful or helpful to articulate a mission and core values for your organization?

We previously wrote about the ills of presenteeism (when workers show up to work when they shouldn’t), but make no mistake: its twin, absenteeism, remains just as much of a problem – and perhaps an even more visible one.

Here are 25 steps you can take to reduce absenteeism among your workforce.  

1. Articulate and distribute attendance policies that set clear expectations.

Deloitte’s 2016 Human Capital Trends report discussed an interesting and emerging concept in HR: design thinking. They define “design thinking” as “becoming experience architects.” But what exactly does that mean, and how might you put this idea to use in your organization? Read on…

What is design thinking?

Retailing giant Amazon.com is dedicated to data-driven decisions that result in increased employee productivity. It’s an organization known for experimenting with approaches to managing employees, and one of its most recent experiments is also one of the most interesting…and potentially employee-friendly. Starting in Fall 2016, Amazon began limiting certain teams’ weeks to 30-hours instead of 40. They receive 75% of the pay as 40-hour workers, but all the same benefits.

Not all employees are alike. Some excel in their roles, while under-performing workers can drag down the bottom-line. Most fall somewhere in the middle. In Part 1 of this series, we introduced several ways to figure out which employee is which.

Not all employees are alike. Some excel in their roles, while under-performing workers can drag down the bottom-line. Most fall somewhere in the middle. In Part 1 of this series, we introduced several ways to figure out which employee is which. In Part 2, we discussed management strategies specific to those workers in the middle of the range. Today we’ll focus on how to help top performers thrive.
More than half of U.S. workers (51%) have been part of an office romance, according to the 2015 Office Romance Survey from Vault, which produces workplace rankings and reviews. Most of these are just casual romances, but 10% actually found their spouse or partner at work! Unfortunately, workplace romances introduce a host of potential personnel issues for employers.

Not all employees are alike. Some excel in their roles, while under-performing workers can drag down the bottom-line. Most fall somewhere in the middle. In Part 1 of this series, we introduced several ways to figure out which employee is which. Today, we’ll be discussing management strategies specific to those workers in the middle of the range. 

Redefine your thinking: high potential, if not high performance.

In the space of just a couple of months or so, the U.S. goes through a series of major holiday events, starting with Halloween and ending with New Year’s Day. With so many major events crammed into a relatively brief period, the holiday season is often one of the busiest and most demanding times of year for everyone – employers and employees alike. That, in turn, can have a negative impact on productivity, if employees are distracted by being pulled in too many directions at once, or they are fretting over meeting all the demands on their time and energy, or the workplace is unprepared. Here are six tips for keeping productivity high during and after the holidays!
Job-related stress is a serious issue, that may be getting worse: the American Psychology Association’s Center for Organizational Excellence found in 2013 that one-third of working Americans experience chronic stress. The problem may be getting worse: a more recent 2015 survey from Workplace Trends and Staples Advantage, reported by CIO Magazine, found that over half (53%) of workers are overworked and burned out.
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